Coronavirus Update From New York City: May 7, 2020

I hope that all my readers are doing well, staying healthy, and staying safe.

I continue to remain physically healthy, and so does the rest of my family. We also remain financially healthy, as nobody in my family has lost jobs due to the pandemic. I have also been able to get two things done on the blogging front:

  • I had a guest post on another blog. Namely, I had a guest post on how segregation in a major city is not just a Philadelphia issue (the blogger has written about racial segregation in her home city of Philadelphia, among other things). Thanks to fellow blogger Kayla for publishing this post, and I encourage you all to check out her blog, Dear Destiny!
  • I now have a page on my blog titled “2020 Coronavirus Diary.” On that page, I have links to all of these weekly update posts on the coronavirus in New York, as well as blog posts relevant to the coronavirus. This page was created with the goal of others being able to see what the virus was like in New York City, an epicenter of it.

While I’m happy these things happened, these are really temporary distractions from the current grim reality. Last week, I made a mention of my mom’s calculation that we have sixteen friends, family members of friends, or friends of friends who have died from the coronavirus. Now, I think that count is above twenty.

My state is continuing to experience declines in hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions, and deaths. A few weeks ago, we were losing 700-800 New Yorkers a day. Now, we’re losing 200-300 New Yorkers a day. Granted, every life lost is awful, but I present this contrast between 700-800 daily deaths and 200-300 daily deaths to hopefully show others (particularly those who are eager to reopen before hospitalizations and deaths drop down significantly) that these measures, harsh as they may seem, are saving lives.

Hopefully, these positive trends in New York continue in the coming weeks. On May 15th, parts of the state will start to reopen, starting with parts of the state that haven’t been as severely affected by the coronavirus as other parts of the state (so New York City is likely not reopening on May 15th). At that, New York will start with some industries in less affected parts of the state where social distancing can still be practiced in the work that is done (for example, some forms of construction). Given how badly New York has been hit by the coronavirus, Governor Cuomo seems to be (rightly, in my opinion) taking a cautious approach to reopening the state.

So, when you’re hearing stories around this time next week about New York starting to open back up again, that may apply to people in parts of the state, but it likely won’t apply to New York City.

Do you have any outstanding questions about how I’m doing or how New York is doing? If so, feel free to ask in the comments section below!

Announcing Another New Blog Series!

One of the criticisms I’ve heard about social justice circles from the outside is that there are a lot of words we use, but do not always explain what those words mean. Some of us hear words such as TERFs, intersectionality, microaggressions, heteronormativity, and many more, but unless you’re deep in circles that deal with TERFs, intersectionality, microaggressions, or heteronormativity, you may not know what those words mean.

The knee-jerk response may be not make the effort to understand what these words mean, and just move on. Or, if your thoughts are more antagonistic to people in social justice movements, you might label one who uses these words as a “social justice warrior” or a “liberal snowflake.”

I propose a different way of interacting with these terms: familiarizing ourselves with these words that may be unfamiliar to us. In order to help familiarize ourselves and others with words or phrases commonly heard in social justice circles but misunderstood or not understood at all outside of them, I will start a new series on this blog, called “What is _______?”

The concept of the “What is _______?” series is that I take a term used in social justice circles that is often not used or not understood outside of those circles, explain what that term means, potentially give some examples to further clarify what that term means, and explain why it’s a term that is important to understand.

I am currently planning to write posts on the following terms (in no particular order):

  • Privilege
  • Four waves of feminism
  • Toxic positivity
  • TERFs
  • Intersectionality
  • Calling out/calling in (two terms, but these terms belong together in a post)
  • Microaggressions
  • Cultural appropriation/cultural appreciation
  • Heteronormativity
  • Safe space
  • White guilt
  • Gaslighting
  • Spoonies

I should also note that I am open to including other terms that I don’t list here. Terms that I learn about during the series, as well as terms that others think that I should talk about, are fair game. On that note, if there are any terms you think I should include that I don’t mention here, please let me know in the comments section below or at my email, blindinjustice2017@gmail.com. Even if you don’t think of a term now but think of one later, there’s no need to worry—as I’m planning on doing approximately one post in this series per month, and I have over a dozen terms here, I will be doing this series for over a year.

All of these terms are ones that are important to know, yet may seem like jargon or code to some of us. By explaining what these terms mean and why they’re so important, I’m hoping that many readers will come out with a good understanding of what these words mean. By improving our understanding of terms like these, those who are advocates will hopefully become better advocates, and those who aren’t advocates will hopefully understand what advocates are talking about when using these words.

Early 2020 Blog News

Since my previous “blog news” post in late 2019, I’ve had some further developments related to the blog and blogging in general, as well as some new ideas for the blog. So, with that being said, here are a few pieces of blog news and ideas:

I’ve had readers ask me how (if at all) I will address the 2020 United States presidential election. The answer to that question is that I will look to address major issues relevant to the election that are either misunderstood or not talked about as much as they should be.

In a way, my recent post talking about the 1994 crime bill in some detail offers a sneak peek of what I plan to do on here this year for the election. By focusing on issues that are either misunderstood or “under the radar,” I hope that this little space on the internet can offer a fresh and constructive take on issues that will be discussed this year.

I will start a new blog series very soon.

As to what the series will be on, I have a couple of ideas I want to pursue at some point, and one in particular I’m leaning towards starting. You will find out soon, though!

I had a guest post published on another blog! My post, which was on why I think the United States is more into football/soccer than many people realize, was published on Renard’s World.

Obviously I’m biased because I wrote the post, but I hope some of you check out my post (which you can find here), especially if you want to see the side of me that is a soccer/football fan. I also highly recommend that readers check out the blog that I got this post published on, Renard’s World. While the blog really is on anything that tickles the fancy of the blogger (to use the words of the blog’s main author, Renard), his blog is a must-follow for anyone who wants to learn more about blogging.

Speaking of guest posts, people can feel free to reach out to me if they’d like me to do a guest post on their blog!

I’m happy to have a guest post on another blog about any of the types of topics I blog on at Blind Injustice (ableism, ageism, economic justice, immigrants, LGBTQ+ issues, mental health, etc.), faith/Christianity, as well as select sports topics (especially if it’s about soccer/football, NASCAR, or baseball). All you need to do is reach out to me on my blog or at blindinjustice2017@gmail.com. I offer only three conditions: that you’re okay with my sharing your blog (like I’m sharing Renard’s blog above), that you’re patient with me if I end up with a backlog of people who want me to write guest posts for them, and that if you want me to blog for you more than a couple times a year, you pay me (not that I need the money, but it’s just that I will only spend significant time on a blog that’s not mine if I get some sort of financial compensation for it).[1] If you’re worried about remembering all of this, fear not—I will add a “collaborate with me” page on the blog in the coming days.

For now, that’s pretty much it. I’ll only have a few weeks within the next several months (the weeks of Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day) when I won’t publish a new post on a Monday, so you will read more from me in the coming months!


[1] If you want me to post on your blog multiple times a year and pay me for it, my rate will be 10 cents an hour to start. So, while I’m not free, I’m also not that expensive.

Blog Wrap-Up: Calendar Year 2019

Around this time of year, many of us are looking back at the year—what has gone well, and what didn’t go as well as intended. As such, I thought it was appropriate that I would do a blog wrap-up for 2019, the first time I’m doing such a thing on Blind Injustice.

It was a year when I made some changes to when, and how, I shared my content. I decided to start re-publishing old blog posts sometimes (an idea I got from some other blogs that did the same), decided to change my blog post schedule, and actively use Pinterest as a way to promote my blog. For a person who has, at times in the past, been scared of change, that’s a lot of change. However, these changes have been for the better—re-publishing old blog posts has given my newer readers an opportunity to read some of my older content, my changed blog post schedule works better for me (and many of my readers, I think) than the schedule I used to have, and my post on bisexual stereotypes has been shared around a lot on Pinterest. I was particularly hesitant about using Pinterest because I was afraid of not being able to find appropriate pictures to go with my blog posts, but I’m now very glad to use that social media platform to promote this blog! Sometimes, change is a good thing.

I was also nominated for two blog awards this year, both of which were Mystery Blogger Awards. I want to yet again thank Jordyn at The Chronically Unimaginable as well as Ospreyshire’s Realm for the nominations. Even though this is technically a personal blog, I tend not to talk that much about myself, so these award nominations are a cool opportunity to share parts of myself with my readers.

Another big surprise was that I was able to pull off my LGBTQ+ Stereotypes Series. Even at this time last year, if you asked me whether I felt I was capable of pulling off such a blog post series, my answer would almost certainly be “no.” However, I’m glad that I was able to do the series, as I felt like a learned a lot just by working on it (and, as far as I can tell, many of my readers also learned a lot).

The biggest surprise this year, however, was not my willingness to change some things around or the awards I won, but the fact that my post on men and mental health got so much attention! I don’t even primarily consider myself a mental health blogger (though I have published on some mental health topics), yet that post got more views, more likes, and more comments than anything else I published this calendar year! I didn’t even think that this post was really that much better than most of my other posts, yet my post on men and mental health got attention.

I guess the theme of this wrap-up (if there is one) is that you never know what you’ll learn or get yourself into with blogging. When I started blogging, I couldn’t have dreamt of winning awards, having the discipline to do a blog series, or get as much attention as I have with some of my posts. Yet, it happened, at times I would least expect it. Blogging can be full of surprises, and a lot of good surprises, at that.

Note that I will not publish a post next Monday because it’s the week of New Year’s Day.

Fall/Winter 2019 Blog News

With Election Day now behind us, there are a couple of announcements I want to make about my upcoming blog schedule, as we head into the holidays:

  1. I will not publish posts on the following Mondays over the next few months: November 11 (Veterans Day), November 25 (Monday before Thanksgiving), December 23 (Monday before Christmas), December 30 (Monday before New Year’s Day), January 20 (Martin Luther King Jr. Day), and February 17 (Presidents Day). These breaks from publishing have given me much-needed breaks in past years, especially around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.
  2. That being said, during this stretch around Christmas/New Year’s, I will publish a blog wrap-up for this calendar year. Last year, I experimented with publishing a series of social media posts that highlighted my most read post, my most liked post, the post that received the most comments, etc. However, doing this became challenging for me to keep up with during a time when I was hoping to take it easy. Instead, I will try to publish a single blog post that makes note of some (if not many) of the same highlights (as well as some highlights I didn’t mention in my social media posts last year, such as the blogging awards I received), and this will come in the form of a blog wrap-up for the calendar year. I’m tentatively thinking of publishing this post the day after Christmas, but this is very much subject to change depending on how the holidays are for me. It’s the first time I’m trying this, so I’ll welcome the feedback when/after the post is published!

That’s it for now. Happy reading, and I hope everyone is having a good fall (or spring, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere)!