Shared Post: Four Massive Expenses That Disabled People Are Stuck With

As I said in a recent blog news post, I want to go back to sharing more content from other bloggers who wrote posts that I think should be shared.

One such post is Karly’s post on some massive expenses that disabled people are stuck with.

To be honest, before reading Karly’s post last autumn, I never really thought about the wide range of expenses that only people with disabilities have to pay for. Things that able-bodied people like me frequently take for granted, such as being able to access your own home or your own vehicle, are not accessible for people with limited or no mobility unless modifications are made. And modifications can cost lots of money.

I highly recommend that my readers read Karly’s post, titled “Four Massive Expenses That Disabled People Are Stuck With.” I also highly recommend her blog in general for anyone who wants to learn more about ableism, representation of people with disabilities, mental health, and much more.

For Karly’s post, titled “Four Massive Expenses That Disabled People Are Stuck With”, click here.

For Karly’s blog, click here.

Regarding Tygpress

I was absolutely thrilled when my post on the Mystery Blogger Award was published on Friday afternoon!

And then, I was much less happy when I discovered that my content was being put on a different site, called Tygpress, without my permission. While I don’t personally stand to lose any money because my posts are on there (I don’t earn money through blogging), it’s definitely not honest of them to post my entire posts and present it as if I am one of their writers (I’m not).

I could go on writing a lot more about the whole Tygpress issue, but I think that my readers are probably best served by my sharing a link to Renard’s post over at Renard’s World. He wrote an extremely informative article about this, and I learned a lot of things I didn’t know before!

Renard’s article

Update on 8/5/2019: The Tygpress website is down. Their website currently says the following:

“Tygpress.com is temporarily out of service due to technical issues. will be back soon…


Tygpress.com was created with an intention to create a blog search site , but due to some techical issues, full contents of respective sites were being displayed instead of just excerpts as intended. We thank the complainants for bringing this issue to our notice and We are extremely sorry to the content owners.”

Blog News: Time for Some Feedback from My Readers!

Hello, my readers!

As some of you might know, I already (sometimes, kind of) do Throwback Thursday posts on social media, where I share old content of mine on my Facebook and Twitter accounts. 

Now, I haven’t always been the best at following through on those Throwback Thursday posts on social media, but I still think that doing something similar to that is important because it gives me an opportunity to share old content that is still relevant.

However, I’ve realized recently that I can do the same sort of thing on WordPress. Basically, I’ve discovered that you can re-publish a post on WP that you’ve already published. Ever since discovering that (mostly through other bloggers who’ve used that feature), I have thought about using this feature on my blog to re-publish some of my old posts (especially if they’re relevant to what I do now, or relevant to current events). 

With all that being said, I have a simple question: How would my readers feel about my using this re-publish feature to re-share some old blog posts?

I want to see how my readers feel because honestly, I have somewhat mixed feelings. On one hand, it would be an opportunity to share some posts that many of my readers might not be familiar with (I have many more followers now than I did even one year ago), and additionally it may be good to be reminded of certain “blind injustices.” On the other hand, doing this might give readers the false feeling that I’m publishing new content when in reality, I’m just re-sharing old content. 

So, I am open to hearing others’ feedback (as well as taking feedback from a Doodle poll on this, which one can take here). Do you want to see some of my old content re-published, or not? Depending on the feedback I get,[1] I will decide whether I re-publish old posts.

So, people have one week to give me feedback (until the following Friday at 8:00 PM). I will announce the results of that feedback in a blog news post two weeks from today.


[1] If more than 60% of those who vote and comment approve of what I’m thinking of, I will try to re-share old blog posts at least once a month. If 40-60% approve, then I will re-share less frequently (a few times a year, probably). If fewer than 40% approve, I will just not re-share/re-publish old blog posts at all.

The Fight for African American Civil Rights is Not Over

When my brother and I went through the educational system, we were taught that the big fight for African American civil rights was in the 1950s and 1960s…and then there was nothing on that fight after then.

That is somewhat understandable, because several of the most significant court decisions and pieces of legislation on African American civil rights in the history of the United States happened/passed in the 1950s and 1960s.

However, the fight for African American civil rights is far from over, and in fact, in a number of ways, the United States has seemingly gone backward on African American civil rights.

There is clearly a disconnect going on here, between what some people believe and what the reality is.

Below are three of the common[1] beliefs about African American civil rights that are incorrect. Those incorrect beliefs are in bold and the answers to those incorrect beliefs are in regular text:

  1. We have gone forward on voting rights in recent decades. Actually, the United States has gone backward on voting rights for African Americans. Several years ago, the United States Supreme Court struck down key provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Since then, many hundreds of voting sites have closed down, an overwhelming majority of them being in African American communities.[2] Additionally, Voter ID laws have come into play in numerous states; these ID laws have disproportionately affected people of color.[3] If you think that voting rights for African Americans are going forward, think again.
  2. School segregation is in the past. It’s over. To the contrary, racial integration in schools has also gone backward. This Atlantic article goes into great detail about school segregation in the United States. But the TL; DR (short for too long; didn’t read) version is that school segregation is actually getting worse, and there seems to be relatively little political will to sufficiently address that fact. And that’s not just a problem in the American South—there was a whole feature story, also in The Atlantic, about how the new chancellor of the New York City schools has made desegregation of schools a major priority because segregation has become a problem in New York. The consequence is schools that are separate…and unequal.
  3. White people and people of color are treated equally under the law. That’s not true either; the criminal justice system still shows racial disparities. A study in 2017 showed that black men get 19.1% longer sentences than white men on average…for the same crimes![4] Innocent African Americans are much more likely to be wrongfully convicted than innocent people of other races—50% more likely for murder, 3 ½ times more likely for sexual assault, and a staggering 12 times more likely for drug crimes.[5] The disparities may not come as a surprise for many, but the magnitude of the disparities may catch some off-guard—while also demonstrating that the United States has a long way to go on criminal justice issues.

Some people may yet argue that the fight for African American civil rights is over, and that anyone who believes otherwise is somehow holding on to misplaced bitterness. However, during this Black History Month, I argue that actually, it’s far from over. To the contrary, we’re going backward, whether people realize it or not.


[1] Note that this list is not comprehensive. In order to keep this post relatively short, I narrowed it down to three key areas where the fight for African American civil rights is clearly not over.

[2] https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2018/09/04/polling-places-remain-a-target-ahead-of-november-elections

[3] https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2018/09/04/polling-places-remain-a-target-ahead-of-november-elections

[4] https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/black-men-sentenced-time-white-men-crime-study/story?id=51203491

[5] http://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Documents/Race_and_Wrongful_Convictions.pdf

Political Incorrectness Has Gone Mad…So Mad Some Use it to Justify Injustice

For a long time, I have been hesitant to write about the topic of political correctness (or political incorrectness). The reason for that, I think, is because large numbers of people in the United States hate political correctness with a passion—80% of us think that political correctness is a problem in America.[1] As a result, I was really afraid to go against the popular opinion on this issue.

However, I have changed my mind. It’s time to address political correctness/incorrectness, no matter how unpopular my stance may be.

Namely, we need to address the fact that political incorrectness has gone so mad that many people now use it to justify injustice.

The most recent example of this is the reactions to an ad made a couple of weeks ago by Gillette, called “The Best a Man Can Get?” I’m not going to spoil the ad, but basically the advertisement was a challenge to men (and particularly men with toxic behaviors) to be better than the bullying, catcalling, and harassing behaviors that have created the need for a #MeToo movement.

Some praised the ad. However, many people panned Gillette, and have even said that they will boycott Gillette, because they were “too politically correct.”

Let the above sentence sink in. An anti-bullying, anti-catcalling, anti-sexual harassment ad got criticized for being too politically correct.

By panning this ad as too politically correct, it shows political incorrectness as having gone so mad that an ad promoting basic standards of human decency (don’t bully, don’t catcall, don’t harass) has become controversial.

I wish I could say that the reaction to this Gillette ad was an anomaly, that we as human beings are usually good about treating others with decency. But no…there are other noteworthy examples when too many people have used the idea of political incorrectness to justify injustice. Here are two of the more well-known examples:

  1. There were many times during the 2016 Trump campaign when then-candidate Trump mocked others, ranging from a New York Times reporter for his disability to a former Miss America winner for her being overweight.[2] In the case of the Times reporter, he mocked someone for something that’s impossible to control (a disability), while with the Miss America winner he mocked the woman for something that’s difficult to control (weight). And yet many people (especially/mostly his supporters) defended him by arguing that he was just “speaking his mind” and that his opponents were being too politically correct. What this means was that many of us (or at least enough of us that he’s now president) let political incorrectness go so mad that we somehow justify bullying and fat-shaming.
  2. There was, is, and probably will continue to be a chorus of people who argue that the enforcement on what jokes are funny or hurtful/triggering is too politically correct. With racist “jokes,” rape “jokes,” stalking “jokes” (which I wrote about months ago), and other types of jokes that are potentially hurtful, responses can often range from “Can’t you take a joke?” to “You’re just being too politically correct.” What this means was that many of us let political incorrectness go so mad that we somehow justify making hurtful jokes.

Ultimately, while some may argue that political correctness has gone mad, I would argue that there are times that political incorrectness has gone mad. In fact, political incorrectness has gone so mad that, at times, some of us would rather do what’s politically incorrect than what’s right.


[1] https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/10/large-majorities-dislike-political-correctness/572581/

[2] There are so many examples of Trump’s political incorrectness that I could make a blog post out of it. I could talk about his telling a judge to go back to Mexico, or comments he has said about African Americans and Jews in the past, or any other number of things. For the sake of keeping this post from getting too long, I only cited two examples.