Blog Wrap-Up: Calendar Year 2020

Okay, so I know this is my blog wrap-up post for this calendar year, but in typical 2020 fashion, not even this wrap-up post could be done as normal…

Given the surge in COVID in New York City, I just wanted to give a brief update on COVID here right now, before going on to the main subject of the post, which is the blog wrap-up for this year. Here are some quick updates:

  • Everyone in my immediate family is still COVID-free.
  • That being said, the positivity rate continues to rise where I am, and in the zip code just north of mine, the test positivity rate is approaching a whopping 13%. Needless to say, I still very much feel like we are heading in the wrong direction where I am, in my part of New York City (southern Queens).
  • For the first time since mid-May, New York State is reporting over 100 deaths a day from COVID on a regular basis.
  • For those worried about what I’m doing over the holidays, worry not—I am not traveling during them, and I’m taking care of myself right where I am.

I know this is not the typical way to start a blog wrap-up post for the calendar year, but I figured that it would be better to give a COVID update now, during the middle of the holidays, instead of waiting completely until after the holidays.

Okay, now for my originally scheduled wrap-up post…

Honestly, at times it has felt like just too much to keep up with everything, both personally and blog-wise. I’m guessing that many of my readers might say the same—that it was a struggle to keep up with all that was going on.

And yet, we persevered. We’ve made it through 2020.

In light of all that went on this year in the United States (and in the world), talking about what this year in blogging has been like for me feels a little insignificant. That being said, I would like to highlight some pages on my blog that seem relevant, given all that is going on right now:

  1. My Coronavirus Diary page. This page classified as “Coronavirus Diary” is broken up into two categories: the weekly updates from New York City (something I did for a couple of months when the pandemic was particularly bad in my hometown) and blog posts about injustices related to COVID-19.
  2. My blog’s page on racial issues. While I have some posts on that page that precede the killing of George Floyd, some of my older content is as relevant as ever, in light of Mr. Floyd’s death. Some posts that may be worth a read (especially if you’re someone who’s followed the blog in the past few months) include ones on how institutional racism affects policing, how the fight for African American Civil Rights is not over, and what white guilt is.
  3. The page I have for the “What Is” blog series. The goal of this series is to hopefully help many of us better understand terms that are often used in social justice circles that some of us may struggle to understand.
  4. The page I have for “blog advice” posts. Since I’ve gained a substantial following, I want to make sure that my own tips on blogging get passed down to both current and future bloggers. I will say that this is taking a back seat to my COVID update posts for now, but whenever this pandemic settles down (and I really believe it’s a “when” and not an “if”), I will continue giving blogging advice.

I want to end this wrap-up post by offering a few “thank-yous”:

First, thank you to those who nominated me for blogging awards. This includes Em at Invincible Woman on Wheels, for the Ideal Inspiration Blogging Award; the blog Living Everyday, for the Outstanding Blogger Award; and Keith V at On My Mind Today for the Blogger Recognition Blog Award.[1]

Thank you, of course, to all my readers this year. I know many people are feeling quite fatigued from all the screen time we’re having, so I don’t take lightly the fact that people are using a little bit of that screen time by reading my blog.

A thank you goes to all the essential workers, such as those in grocery stores, those keeping mass transit running, fire fighters, and many others who kept things functioning as best as they can during COVID. Many of these people had to deal with COVID in their workplaces yet did the best they could to make sure things were kept running—without help from our essential workers during this time, it would be impossible for us to see our most basic needs met.

Most of all, thank you to our EMTs, nurses, doctors, and other medical workers who’ve been helping during this time of pandemic. I am grateful for the work you all do. You all deserve better than the ignoring of basic public health guidance that has led to many of you feeling overwhelmed.

Finally, I just want to wish that everyone has a healthy and safe holiday season.

I will not be publishing a post for the rest of the week, in observance of New Year’s Day.


[1] I still need to do an award post, as this too has taken a back seat for now to the COVID update posts. That being said, I do want to at least acknowledge that I got nominated for this award!

Some Words About the Recent American Election

President-elect Joe Biden. Gage Skidmore from Peoria, AZ, United States of America, CC BY-SA 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

We found out today, November 7, 2020, that Former Vice President Joe Biden will become the 46th President of the United States.

I am glad that Biden won. While his record is not perfect (far from it), I believed that out of all of the candidates for this position, he was the one most capable of leading the country justly through these difficult times.[1] While I know I have written on here about issues with Biden’s past record, I do wish that his presidency is a successful one. To take from the words George H.W. Bush wrote to Bill Clinton upon Clinton becoming President, his success is now our country’s success.

I also know there is a strong possibility of Republicans holding on to the United States Senate. If that is indeed the case (depending on how the runoff elections in Georgia go[2]), I recognize that I will need to be realistic with what Biden is able to address, given the partisan environment with American politics at the moment. But, I shouldn’t get too ahead of myself either, as there will be two runoff elections in Georgia to help determine control of the Senate.

Election results aside, I think that there are a few thank yous that a lot of us, myself included, owe in light of the election that recently happened.

First and foremost, thank you to we, the American people, for turning out in such high numbers! Reports seem to be indicating that the turnout for this election is the highest it has been in generations. Hopefully, this level of engagement with our elections will continue well beyond 2020.

A thank you must also go to people who’ve worked the polls and counted the ballots. Without the work of these people, it would not be possible to have an election.

I thank those involved in overseeing the operations of this election. Many Secretaries of State (regardless of political affiliation) as well as local Boards of Elections have operated this election, in the middle of a pandemic, about as smoothly as one could reasonably expect. Furthermore, in light of baseless claims of election fraud from President Trump, many involved in overseeing this election have gone to great pains to be transparent about the election process (even to the point of doing things like having livestreams of places where votes are being counted). I hope this transparency will increase the faith some of us have in American democracy—a faith that seemed to be on shaky ground heading into this election.

My final thank you goes to all of the people outside the United States who have expressed thoughts for, and in the case of people of faith, prayers for, us as we go through this election. These have been tense times, so I appreciate the thoughts, well-wishes, and prayers.

Speaking of thoughts and prayers, I will end this post by requesting that people hope for (and, if you’re the praying type, pray for) a smooth transition of power from President Trump to President-elect Biden. I am sadly not confident that the transition will be smooth or that Trump will even accept the fact he lost this election, but given the challenges this country currently faces, a smooth transition of power is desperately needed.

Author’s Note: I am aware that the Trump campaign has made numerous legal challenges regarding the election results. I am also aware that Trump himself has not conceded as of the time of my writing this. However, what I hear from legal experts (which I am not) is that the legal challenges from the Trump campaign are highly unlikely to change the result of this election (even if said challenges succeed, and the overwhelming majority of challenges are not succeeding from what I hear).

Second Author’s Note: I will not publish a post next week as Veterans Day is next week.

Third Author’s Note: This post was written recently, so I apologize for any typos that may appear here.



[1] If you’re wondering why I believe this, please refer to the blog post where I explain why I support Biden: https://blindinjusticeblog.com/2020/10/26/how-issues-of-injustice-influenced-my-presidential-pick/

[2] Currently, Democrats have 48 seats (a tally that includes two independents who caucus with the Democrats). The elections for both United States Senate races in Georgia are going to a runoff. If Democrats win both races, their 50 seats will be enough to control the Senate because Vice President Kamala Harris serves as the tiebreaking vote.

Three Notes: Please Vote, Wear Your Mask, and Socially Distance

I did not publish a post yesterday evening for a reason: because I wanted to start off early Tuesday, Election Day, with a reminder for people to vote if they have not voted already.

Many of you who’ve read this will have already voted; if you are one of them, great! But if you are eligible to vote and you haven’t voted, then today is your day to vote. If you are voting today, please wear your mask and socially distance when going to the polls.

Speaking of mask wearing, I’ve noticed quite a bit of vitriol from anti-mask people. I don’t know if this is a post that will reach any such individuals, but let me be frank—before we knew about the science of mask wearing in New York (and elsewhere), the COVID situation here was a living nightmare. Hospital sirens were constant. My family went through a 10-week period where we lost, on average, three people we knew a week. A hospital in my county lost thirteen individuals…in 24 hours. This was the world without mask wearing. I beg people to wear their masks.

A Blog Award: The Ideal Inspiration Blogger Award

During my two-week hiatus from blogging, I was nominated for the Ideal Inspiration Blog Award by Em at Invincible Woman on Wheels through this post. Thanks, Em, for the nomination!

Here are the rules for the award:

  1. Thank the person who nominated you and link back to their blog.
  2. Answer your nominator’s questions.
  3. Nominate up to 9 other bloggers.
  4. Notify your nominees.
  5. Ask 5 questions.
  6. List the rules and display the “Ideal Inspiration Blogger Award ” logo.

These were the questions that Em gave me and all the other people she nominated. My answers are in bold:

  1. Where would you be right now if you could be anywhere? Jerusalem. It’s a place I’d love to go one day just because it’s an important city for multiple major religions. Of course, even without COVID-19, I’m hesitant to go there because of safety concerns.
  2. What is the best concert you’ve ever been to, or if you’ve not been to a concert, which is the concert you’d most like to go to? I’ve never been to a concert! And, honestly, I’m not sure what concert I’d like to go to, as I’ve never been much into concerts. I’m more likely to go to a baseball game. Readers should feel free to give me recommendations in the comments below!
  3. What would your perfect day consist of if you could do anything? My perfect day would start with a breakfast that includes bacon and chocolate chip pancakes with real maple syrup (none of this “breakfast syrup” nonsense that is served at many restaurants). If soccer or Formula One is on during breakfast, all the better. I’d follow that up with a short walk—walks are centering for me spiritually, as I am of the praying type and walks are a time I often pray. Then, during the day, I would just spend quality time with friends and/or family—it doesn’t matter a whole lot what I’m doing, though (as long as it’s not illegal or so boring it puts me to sleep). I don’t need a yacht or a Ferrari to have a “perfect day.”
  4. What would be your dream 3-course meal? That’s a tough call because there’s so much food I love to eat! My answer also depends on the season I’m in, as during the summer I prefer food that’s cooler (as opposed to hot comfort food in the winter). My ideal summer meal would include fresh mozzarella and tomatoes for the appetizer, breaded chicken with a bruschetta-like topping[1] for the main course, and tartufo[2] for dessert—basically, three of the four courses I can get at my favorite Italian restaurant. My ideal winter meal includes a macaroni and cheese appetizer, steak and ale pie as the entrée,[3] and a hot fudge brownie with a scoop of ice cream on top for dessert.
  5. Let’s spread a little more blog love: Who are 5 bloggers you would recommend for me to check out? I will highlight those bloggers among the nominees below!

Here are my nominees (in no particular order). Given the current climate with racial injustice in the United States, I want to highlight bloggers who are using their blogs to advocate for racial justice in their own ways, and do so regardless of whether any or all of these blogs will do their own award posts:

  1. The Ghetto Activist: If you want a blog that educates and challenges you on Black history, White privilege, and racism, this is a blog I highly recommend. Even though I was a history major in college, posts such as the one on the East St. Louis Race Riot in 1917 have educated me on things I knew nothing about before.
  2. Black Feminist Collective: If you want to follow a blogger (well, more like a set of bloggers) that is dedicated to intersectional feminism, and feminism that includes people of color, this is one to follow.
  3. We Hold These Truths To Be Self-Evident: When I was early in my blogging journey, Xena’s blog was one of the first ones I found that dedicated itself to anti-racism work.
  4. Katelyn Skye Bennett: This blog is currently doing a series called “Intersected,” which explores how racism touches various aspects of peoples’ lives. I highly recommend that people read this series, as it really informs people on how racism can touch us in ways some of us may not think of.
  5. Fakequity: As with Xena’s, this is a blog with a major focus on anti-racism that I’ve been following for a long time.

These are the questions for my nominees:

  1. How did you get into blogging?
  2. What made you interested in blogging on the subject(s) you blog about?
  3. How, if at all, did the pandemic change the way you blogged?
  4. How, if at all, did the recent attention on racial injustice change the way you blogged?
  5. If you could give just one piece of advice to a new blogger, what would it be?

[1] This bruschetta recipe should give an explanation of what bruschetta is: https://www.food.com/recipe/best-ever-bruschetta-443987. The difference, of course, is that instead of bread on the bottom, it’s a breaded chicken on the bottom.

[2] Tartufo is an Italian dessert that has a chocolate shell on the outside, and then on the inside two or more flavors of ice cream plus a frozen fruit or fruit syrup in the center.

[3] I feel very nostalgic about this particular dish. My family would visit a late family member in York, England, and the first place we’d visit for food after a long flight would often be this pub that had amazing steak-and-ale pies. P.S. If you’re looking for food recommendations if you visit York (whenever the pandemic comes to pass), I have a few!

Like Blind Injustice on Facebook

Follow @blindinjustices on Twitter

Follow Blind Injustice on Pinterest

Coronavirus Update From New York City: April 16, 2020

Let me start by saying that I apologize for the delay in getting this post to you all! I had some evening work to do, and then there were some other things I needed to do after my work was done for the evening. Better late than never, I guess!

Even now, nobody in my family has gotten any coronavirus symptoms. I’ve said this before and I will say it again–I am really wondering whether we’ve had this before without realizing and we have immunity built up, or whether we had coronavirus and were asymptomatic, or what. All of us in my household at this point (myself, my brother, and my parents) personally know multiple people who’ve fallen ill from the coronavirus, and all of us know of people (friends of friends, at minimum) who have died from the coronavirus.

Speaking of deaths, it appears that deaths have flatlined, but they have flatlined at a horrible rate. Each day in the last week (maybe longer), New York’s Governor Cuomo has reported somewhere between 600 and 800 deaths per day. One death is a death too many, but 600-800 deaths per day is just an incomprehensible level of tragedy and grief. I sincerely hope that these numbers go down quickly, and go down soon. I also hope that whenever we do reopen my city, my state, my country, that we don’t do so in a way that results in our ending up with this level of loss of life again, because honestly, it’s too much loss.

On the topic of death (and sorry if this is too much talk of death for some people), I do want to address something that President Trump suggested: that the number of deaths due to the coronavirus in New York City is inflated.[1] The issue at-hand is that New York City recently reported an additional 3,700 or so “probable” deaths from the coronavirus (surging the number of deaths from the coronavirus in New York City past 10,000). These probable deaths are cases where the coronavirus or something similar to the coronavirus is listed on the death certificate as the cause of death, but the dead person never officially got tested for the coronavirus.[2] These are deaths that could probably be attributed to the coronavirus, hence probable deaths.

I know today wasn’t the most fun or hopeful of posts, but I hope my readers are doing okay, and that you all are staying healthy!


[1] https://www.silive.com/coronavirus/2020/04/trump-suggests-nyc-is-padding-coronavirus-death-count-with-presumed-cases.html

[2] https://www.politico.com/states/new-york/albany/story/2020/04/14/new-york-city-coronavirus-death-toll-jumps-by-3-700-after-uncounted-fatalities-are-added-1275931