Bisexual Stereotypes

As I said in May, I will be doing a series addressing stereotypes for LGBTQ+ people—talking about people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer, as well as people who are intersex and asexual. I look forward to continuing through this series.

As I have already talked about lesbian and gay stereotypes, I will talk about bisexual stereotypes today. But before talking about bisexual stereotypes, it must first be understood what it means to be bisexual.

A bisexual person is someone who is attracted to more than one sex and/or gender.[1] For example, a man attracted to both men and women is bisexual, and a woman attracted to both women and men is bisexual.

Now that readers who didn’t know about bisexuality now hopefully know what it means to be bisexual, here are a few stereotypes associated with being bisexual that has been brought to my attention from other people:

  1. Bisexual people are attracted to all genders and sexual identities. No, that’s not necessarily true, though the stereotype I just stated is closer to a description of what pansexuality is, as pansexuality involves attraction regardless of one’s sex or gender identity.
  2. A bisexual man is only attracted to men and women, and a bisexual woman is only attracted to women and men. For some bisexual people, that is what bisexuality looks like. However, as bisexuality involves attraction to more than one sex or gender, a person’s bisexuality may look different from that.
  3. Bisexual people are “confused.” Someone who is unsure or confused of their sexuality usually goes under a different label: questioning. “Bisexual” does not necessarily equal confused.
  4. Being bisexual is easy because you can “pass off as straight.” Yes, it is true that the majority of bisexual individuals end up in heterosexual marriages,[2] and that therefore one might be able to “pass off as straight.” As to whether this means that bisexual people have it “easy,” I think that this question is best answered by people who have the lived experience of being bisexual themselves.

These, of course, are just a few of the harmful stereotypes associated with being bisexual. If there are other stereotypes about bisexual people that should be discussed and/or if anyone wants to expand upon the bisexual stereotypes mentioned here, please feel free to post a comment below!

Previous posts in my series on LGBTQ+ stereotypes:


[1] I should note that not all people have the same definition of bisexuality, so my definition might not be exactly the same as someone else’s definition. That being said, it seems like a lot of bisexual people have accepted that definition, so this is the definition I will go with for the purposes of this piece: https://www.hrc.org/resources/bisexual-faq

[2] A Pew Research Survey from 2015 said that only 9% of bisexual people in the survey had same-sex partners while 84% were in heterosexual relationships: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/02/20/among-lgbt-americans-bisexuals-stand-out-when-it-comes-to-identity-acceptance/

The Bisexual Pride Flag

Regarding Tygpress

I was absolutely thrilled when my post on the Mystery Blogger Award was published on Friday afternoon!

And then, I was much less happy when I discovered that my content was being put on a different site, called Tygpress, without my permission. While I don’t personally stand to lose any money because my posts are on there (I don’t earn money through blogging), it’s definitely not honest of them to post my entire posts and present it as if I am one of their writers (I’m not).

I could go on writing a lot more about the whole Tygpress issue, but I think that my readers are probably best served by my sharing a link to Renard’s post over at Renard’s World. He wrote an extremely informative article about this, and I learned a lot of things I didn’t know before!

Renard’s article

Update on 8/5/2019: The Tygpress website is down. Their website currently says the following:

“Tygpress.com is temporarily out of service due to technical issues. will be back soon…


Tygpress.com was created with an intention to create a blog search site , but due to some techical issues, full contents of respective sites were being displayed instead of just excerpts as intended. We thank the complainants for bringing this issue to our notice and We are extremely sorry to the content owners.”

Another Blog Award! This Time, the Mystery Blogger Award

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As my readers can tell by the title of today’s post, I was nominated for another blogging award!

This time, I was nominated for the Mystery Blogger Award! In the words of the creator of the award, Okoto Enigma, it’s “an award for amazing bloggers with ingenious posts. Their blog not only captivates; it inspires and motivates. They are one of the best out there, and they deserve every recognition they get. This award is also for bloggers who find fun and inspiration in blogging; and they do it with so much love and passion.” I thank Okoto for starting the award, as it’s a great way to spread the word on others’ blogs. For more details on the award, as well as Okoto’s blog, you can click here.

I also want to thank Jordyn at The Chronically Unimaginable (link: https://thechronicallyunimaginable.blog/) for nominating me! Her blog, which focuses on chronic illness, mental health, and disability, is consistently eye-opening and awesome, so I encourage my readers to check her blog out!

In order to accept the nomination, there are a few things I should do:

  • Put the award logo/image on your blog.
  • List the rules.
  • Thank whoever nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  • Mention the creator of the award and provide a link as well.
  • Tell your readers 3 things about yourself.
  • Nominate 10 – 20 bloggers.
  • Notify your nominees by commenting on their blog.
  • Ask your nominees any 5 questions of your choice; with one weird or funny question (specify).
  • Share a link to your best post(s).

I’ve already done the first four on this list, so I’m off to a good start! Now to three things about myself:

  1. I went to a Catholic high school seminary. That’s because, at one point, I was discerning for the Catholic priesthood! It took me until a couple years into my college career to realize that I wasn’t called to the priesthood, but it’s an important part of my life.
  2. Back when I was in high school, I was on my school’s speech and debate team, in a category called extemporaneous speaking. In that category, I had to make a 7-minute speech on a current events question I draw at random…and had to make that speech within 30 minutes of receiving the question. So, if you need someone to make a speech on the fly, I’m your guy!
  3. In spite of being pretty successful on my speech and debate team, I sometimes trip over my own words. For example, one time my late grandpa offered “butterscotch ripple” as an ice cream flavor option, and I said that I wanted “butterscotch scripple.” Oops.

As for my favorite posts, it’s difficult to select a few posts because I’ve done over 100 of them at this point! However, here are three of my favorites, in date order (mentioning in bold why it’s one of my favorites):

  1. “The #MeToo Campaign” (https://blindinjusticeblog.com/2017/10/17/the-metoo-campaign/): It was a difficult topic for me to write on, but what makes this among my favorites was the fact that so many people were helped and touched by it.
  2. “Self-Care is Not Selfish” (https://blindinjusticeblog.com/2018/11/20/self-care-is-not-selfish/): It’s a personal favorite because it represents a complete transformation for me, as far as my mental health was concerned—from not practicing self-care to practicing self-care, and then from practicing self-care to teaching others about self-care.
  3. “Looking to Share Emotional Burdens with a Friend? Before Sharing, Let’s Seek Consent” (https://blindinjusticeblog.com/2018/12/04/looking-to-share-emotional-burdens-with-a-friend-before-sharing-lets-seek-consent/): Mostly, I really like this post because I brought to light an idea (emotional consent) that I think has the power to transform countless friendships, dating relationships, and even marriages.

Jordyn gave me a few questions to answer, so here are her questions, and my answers to them:

  1. Why did you decide to start blogging? I felt that there were a ton of injustices that people (myself included) were blind to and/or blindly committed, and that those “bind injustices” should be talked about on a larger scale. So, I started to blog.
  2. Have you ever been ticketed (or arrested) for anything before? My home got some $25 ticket years ago for a recycling violation, and I’m the main person in the family who deals with trash and recycling. So I guess that counts?
  3. In 5 words or less, describe your greatest strength. Care for others.
  4. Would you put pineapple on pizza? Yes! I love a good ham and pineapple pizza.
  5. What is the strangest thing you did as a child? Oh gosh…there were so many strange things I did when I was a child. Echoing everything my brother said (to the point of annoying him) is probably somewhat high on that list.

My nominees (in no particular order) are:

Here are my questions for the nominees:

  1. Does your blog focus on a different topic (or set of topics) than you did when you started it? If so, what made you decide to change the focus of your blog?
  2. What is the best piece of blogging advice you’ve received?
  3. What’s your dream job?
  4. What was the funniest fear you had when you were a child? (I guess that’s funny/weird.)
  5. It is often asked whether you would rather travel forward or backward in a time machine, but do you even want a time machine in the first place? Why? (Well, make that two weird questions.)

Thanks for reading! This is different from what I usually write about, but hopefully you all learned a thing or two about me today! Also, hopefully people will be able to read my post, because WordPress was a bit glitchy when I originally put my draft on here!

On Telling People to “Go Back to Their Home Countries”

A few weeks ago, President Donald Trump garnered controversy and rightful accusations of racism when he said over Twitter that four first-term congresswomen of color—Ayanna Presley, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar—were told to “go back to their home countries” and fix them. 

The immediate response by all involved was focused on President Trump himself. Some people (mostly Democrats, with a few Republicans) condemned President Trump’s remarks and/or President Trump himself as racist, while others (mostly Republicans) said that the remarks were unfortunate, but those others stopped short of accusing the President of being a racist. 

However, since this conflict happened a few weeks ago at this point, I think that we need to look at President Trump’s remarks within a larger context: the fact that it is sadly quite common for people in the United States to be told to “go back to their home countries,” and that this rhetoric as a whole, as well as the root of this rhetoric (a fear of difference) needs to be confronted.

I have never experienced anyone telling me to go back to my home country, but I know of and know personally people who have. Those who are told to “go back to their home countries” are often told so for one or more of the following reasons: they are speaking in a language other than English, they have an accent that doesn’t sound American, they are critical of the United States in ways that some may not like it, and/or they just don’t “look American” (often, “looking American” is these days implied as looking European[1]). I’m sure that there are other reasons that people are told to “go back to their home countries”, but most of the time, it’s one or more of those four reasons that comes up.

These reasons, of course, do not justify the hateful rhetoric that certain people who are in the United States by legal means do not belong here. Not by a longshot. However, these reasons do give some insights as to the sorts of prejudice we’re up against when people suggest that others should “go back to their home countries”—we’re up against prejudices which believe that a person who doesn’t speak a certain language (English), a person who has a doesn’t have a certain type of accent, a person who doesn’t adhere to a certain political ideology, and/or a person who doesn’t look a certain way (white) is not American and is not deserving of being in the United States of America. In other words, we’re up against prejudices that are the product of a fear of difference, whether it be fear of different languages, fear of different political leanings, and/or fear of different skin colors.


[1] The definition of what it means to “look American” has changed though over the course of American history—it used to include

Why the Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act Felt Bittersweet

A few weeks ago, many disability rights advocates celebrated the 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). On July 26, 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed this landmark legislation into law.

I wanted to be in a celebratory mood on the anniversary of the ADA. Yet, as I suddenly remembered how far people with disabilities still need to come before they have the same opportunities as able-bodied people like me, the anniversary felt a little bittersweet.

Now, don’t get me wrong—in spite of the statement I just said, I think that the ADA is arguably the most significant piece of civil rights legislation in the last fifty years (the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965). It is a piece of legislation that improves the lives of millions of Americans, and it is a piece of legislation which, in many cases, enables disabled people to have access to the same opportunities that their able-bodied counterparts have.

While the legislation has improved the lives of millions, it still has a way to go to give disabled people the same access as able-bodied people.

For example, while transit access has improved for people with disabilities, they don’t have access equal to their able-bodied counterparts. One need not look further than the fact that subway systems in New York, Chicago, and Boston, for example, do not have universal wheelchair access (though New York’s situation is much worse than that of Boston or Chicago).

Furthermore, while many buildings now have ADA access, the quality of that access (in the form of things like elevators and ramps) can widely vary. Sometimes the ADA access is top-notch, and sometimes the access leaves something to be desired (everyone can probably think of examples of unreliable elevators).

There is the potential for people with disabilities in many cases to have opportunities similar to able-bodied people like me. But in many areas, that potential hasn’t been fully realized, even though the ADA was passed over a quarter century ago. And there is a certain disappointment, a certain bittersweetness, that I feel as a result of this potential that hasn’t been fully realized.

But why should you all, as readers, care about my being bittersweet about the anniversary of the ADA, let alone one of the reasons I feel bittersweet? I think all of you should care because my bittersweetness is a reminder for all of us that the advancement of disabled persons’ rights did not end with the ADA. Instead, the uneven progress in accessibility for people with disabilities is a reminder that there is still much to advocate for.